Updated August 29 at 7:42am

How do I follow up without seeming overbearing?

I get a ton of emails from people seeking insight or asking me to solve their sales dilemmas. Here are a few that may relate to your job, your life, and (most important) your sales thought process right now.

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How do I follow up without seeming overbearing?

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I get a ton of emails from people seeking insight or asking me to solve their sales dilemmas. Here are a few that may relate to your job, your life, and (most important) your sales thought process right now.

Jeffrey, As you suggest, my company is going to start filming client video testimonials. There will be some clients we would not invite to give a testimonial due to their less than stellar reputation in our community. What is the diplomatic response to such clients if they ask, “How come you didn’t ask me to do a testimonial?”

Dude, invite them. Feed them. Make them feel good. You don’t have to use their testimonial, but it doesn’t hurt you to shoot one with them. C’mon. Use your head. Why would you not invite somebody to your birthday party? Don’t you like birthday presents? Bring them. Best regards, Jeffrey.

Jeffrey, What do you suggest as a follow-up after providing a prospect with quotes or offers? I don’t want to come across as pushy or put them on the defensive.

Why are you giving them a quote anyway? Why aren’t you having a meeting with them? Why aren’t you sitting down with them to address what’s going to happen after they take ownership and make certain that productivity and profitability are maximized by you? Anybody that gives a quote and is waiting for an answer is a fool because they’re going to lose to somebody with a 10-cent lower price. Best regards, Jeffrey.

Jeffrey, how do I overcome the “price issue” when the retailers only concern is to buy a cheaper product so they can enjoy a fatter margin?

Answer: Your premise in incorrect. The retailer wants to ring the cash register, not just have a fatter margin. If they’re selling crappy products at a high margin, eventually they’re going to get caught. In today’s world, you can’t do that anymore and it’s because of one word: Amazon. Anything that anybody sells, trying to get a fatter margin than Amazon does, they’re going to get caught in two seconds. What you want is something the customer can win on value, and then go home and tell all their friends, “This is the best stuff I’ve ever had! You’ve got to go to Bob’s retail marketplace and buy it.” It’s all about reputation. It’s all about quality. It is not all about price anymore. Best regards, Jeffrey.

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