Updated July 3 at 9:03pm

Lakefront living only way for some

By Rhonda Miller
PBN Staff Writer

Born and raised along Bungay Lake in Mansfield, Scott Freerksen has a deep appreciation for and understanding of the green benefits and challenges and the emotional attachments that come with lakefront living.

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Lakefront living only way for some

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Born and raised along Bungay Lake in Mansfield, Scott Freerksen has a deep appreciation for and understanding of the green benefits and challenges and the emotional attachments that come with lakefront living.

So it was not surprising when after 17 years in the field of engineering, Freerksen gave up his corporate job in robotics to sell lakefront and pond-front properties for a real estate company.

In 2009 Freerksen, who calls himself “The Lake Guy,” formed his own company, Lakefront Living Realty, located on the same lake where he was raised. He employs four additional agents who also handle only lakefront and pond-front properties in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire. He’s planning to expand to Vermont and Maine.

“Lakefront is a niche that’s provided the ability to stay steady” even during downturns in the overall real estate market, said Freerksen. “They tend to sell better when they become available and they tend to hold their value better.”

The real estate company’s online site gets 25,000 visitors a month, he said.

“There are a lot more buyers than there are properties. And all I deal with is direct lakefront homes,” he said. “About 70 percent of the stuff you Google is not really lakefront. It’s across the street or has water rights.”

Handling properties on lakes and ponds means there’s not the concern that comes with other waterfront properties affected by tidal changes, and in the longer view, the possible impact of climate change, Freerksen said.

“You do have to deal with conservation commissions because you’re a short distance from the water and it falls under the Wetlands Protection Act,” he said. “You have to be aware of issues like construction run-off, wells or septic systems and flood insurance.”

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