RIPTA eyes expanded service, but who will pay?

UNFAIR FARES? The RIPTA Riders Alliance rallies in Providence's Kennedy Plaza against proposed fare changes that could include charges for the disabled, elderly and riders with low incomes. From left: Ed Benson, foreground with cane; Barry Schiller, with microphone; Paul Hubbard and Patricia Raub, alliance vice president. / PBN PHOTO/ MICHAEL SALERNO
UNFAIR FARES? The RIPTA Riders Alliance rallies in Providence's Kennedy Plaza against proposed fare changes that could include charges for the disabled, elderly and riders with low incomes. From left: Ed Benson, foreground with cane; Barry Schiller, with microphone; Paul Hubbard and Patricia Raub, alliance vice president. / PBN PHOTO/ MICHAEL SALERNO
David Ray uses public transportation every day to get to work, which makes him an anomoly in Rhode Island. On a recent afternoon, the Brown University employee sat on a bench in Providence's Kennedy Plaza, waiting for his bus home to Warwick. On days with no schedule mishaps, riding the bus takes about 50 minutes,…

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2 COMMENTS

  1. To clarify, the RIPTA Riders Alliance, realizing that passengers have to help the budget too, is open to a rush-hour fare for those now riding free, and higher fares for the long distance expresses, and maybe to adjusting the 200% of Federal poverty levels to qualify for the free rides. But employers who offer “free” (that is subsidized) parking for employees (such as the State of RI, or URI-Providence) and no transit incentives should also do something to more level the playing filed. Not to do this hurts not just RIPTA, but our commuter rail ridership too, as well as the opportunity for transit to improve our state’s economy and environment.

  2. Glad to see some compromise, but it is still not fair for a Providence resident to pay $2.50 to go from one side of the city to the other with a transfer. At the same time Narragansett, Newport, Westerly, etc are paying $2 for trips over 25 miles. Distance means something and long distance fares need to be adjusted. Maybe increased to $4, but discounted with multi purchases as they are now.