Updated August 29 at 7:42am

Study: Fewer drugs may be necessary for HIV therapy

PROVIDENCE – A new multisite study reveals patients with drug-resistant HIV can safely achieve viral suppression – the primary goal of HIV therapy – without incorporating the traditional class of HIV medications into their treatment regimen.

To continue reading this article, please do one of the following.



Enter your email to receive Providence Business News' e-newsletters
and breaking news alerts.  

Study: Fewer drugs may be necessary for HIV therapy

Posted:

PROVIDENCE – A new multisite study reveals patients with drug-resistant HIV can safely achieve viral suppression – the primary goal of HIV therapy – without incorporating the traditional class of HIV medications into their treatment regimen.

The research was led by Dr. Karen Tashima, director of the HIV Clinical Trials Program at The Miriam Hospital, who served as study chair.

Tashima and colleagues presented the results from the 48-week study at the annual Conference for Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Atlanta on March 6.

According to the study, treatment-experienced patients can leave out this class of medication, known as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, as part of the regimen. These results could change treatment guidelines, lessen side effects and increase adherence rates, the researchers say.

“Drugs from this class may not be needed if the new treatment plan contains more effective medications,” said Tashima. •

27~50, 031813 HEALTH CARE News Briefs, , 27~50, ISSUE031813EXPORT.pbn

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment
Latest News