Updated March 31 at 10:09pm
Aquaculture
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Fishery management traditionally has focused on fishing pressure, the removal of animals from a population with nets, lines and traps, as the only statistic worth using in the regulatory equation. more
Oysters, which account for about 98 percent of all Rhode Island aquaculture products, increased in value by 49 percent in 2013 compared to the previous year, according to David Beutel, aquaculture coordinator for the R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council. more
ATLANTA – Aquaculture businesses and private nonprofits in certain Rhode Island and Massachusetts counties are now eligible to receive economic-injury disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration as a result of the below-average ocean temperatures and “excessive ice” this past winter. more
Rhode Island will receive an additional $7 million from the U.S. Department of the Interior to clean up damage to the state’s coastline following Hurricane Sandy and prepare the state for future storms, U.S. Sen. Jack Reed announced Monday. more
For nearly two decades the once-booming East Coast butterfish market has been dormant. But that could change. In the past two years NOAA Fisheries has begun raising the butterfish quota. Rhode Island fishermen and fish sellers, including Glenn Goodwin, co-owner of SeaFreeze Ltd., are now looking for ways to reclaim a lost market. Above, Goodwin stands alongside the take-out chute at SeaFreeze Shoreside in Narragansett. more
The Massachusetts Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs has awarded $429,239 in Massachusetts Environmental Trust grants to support 13 local projects to improve water quality and restoration of the state’s rivers, ponds and watersheds. more
Even in the Ocean State, not everyone knows their clams. more
NARRAGANSETT – R.I. Department of Environmental Management Director Janet Coit last week unveiled the new R.I. Marine Fisheries Institute at an event at the University of Rhode Island’s Bay Campus. more
The mystique of being a lighthouse keeper settled into Nick Korstad’s dreams when he was 7 years old and visited a lighthouse on the Oregon coast. The vision grew clearer a few years later when his family moved from Portland to the town of Sequim, Wash., and he went on a tour of a nearby lighthouse. His first visit turned into hundreds of lighthouse visits. more
The U.S. Small Business Administration said that federal economic injury disaster loans are available to small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small aquaculture businesses and most private nonprofit organizations of all sizes in Kent, Providence and Washington counties as a result of the drought that began on July 1. more
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