Updated March 31 at 7:31pm
Op-ed / Letters to the Editor
96 results total, viewing 71 - 80
Tom Friedman, author of “The World is Flat,” told us in 2005 about a fast-moving economic platform, accelerated by information technology advances, which created an environment in which it’s easy to source talent and do business globally. more
Consumers’ share of the cost of health care is getting too little attention when it comes to reform efforts in Rhode Island. We have been celebrating the success of our individual and small-market health-benefits exchange, HealthSource RI, which has extended coverage to more than 90,000 Rhode Islanders through both private health insurance plans and Medicaid. more
First, the good news. Rhode Island’s economic outlook improved over the last year. The unemployment rate has dropped from a peak of 11.9 percent in March 2010 to 9.7 percent in December 2012 to 7.7 percent in August 2014. Between December 2012 and July 2014, the state added 9,700 jobs. more
U.S. consumers may well remember the days, pre-2012, when shopping for an airline ticket was complicated by the airlines’ favored pricing scheme. Back then, an advertised $240 fare might suddenly turn out to be a $300 fare, given that taxes account for roughly 20 percent of the average domestic U.S. airfare. Passengers hated the system while the airlines – which hate price-comparison shoppers, because they drive down prices – embraced it. Fortunately, in 2012, the Department of Transportation imposed a rule requiring that the airlines advertise fares inclusive of the base fare, taxes and fees. Yet, notably, the rule didn’t prohibit the airlines from publishing the taxes and fees separately; it just required that they do so less prominently than the advertised, fully inclusive fare. The airlines, incensed at this pro-consumer bit of rulemaking, have been trying to overturn it ever since. more
When I wrote recently about the joys of the 15-year mortgage, I got the same reaction from a lot of people: “Why would you repay a loan when at these low rates, it’s practically free money?” more
Of all the outrages endured during the financial crisis, perhaps the most perplexing involved money-market mutual funds. In an example of moral hazard writ large, this uninsured risk instrument – with $2.57 trillion in assets – somehow became too big to fail. Five years later, the Securities and Exchange Commission is finally taking steps to address this. more
If you care at all about what academic macroeconomists are cooking up (or if you do any macro investing), you might want to check out the latest economics blog discussion about the big change that happened in the late ’70s and early ’80s. Here’s a post by the University of Chicago ecnomist John Cochrane, and here’s one by Oxford’s Simon Wren-Lewis that includes links to most of the other contributions. more
Last September, Vincenzo Sinapi-Riddle, a student at Citrus Community College near Los Angeles, was collecting signatures on a petition asking the student government to condemn spying by the National Security Agency. more
Mother Jones blogger Kevin Drum is undergoing treatment for cancer. So he takes seriously Republican threats to repeal Obamacare if they win in 2016: "This is more personal for me than usual. Scary, too. There are no guarantees in life, and … more
A relic from the days of the housing boom is making a comeback. The share of sales that feature bidding wars is up. According to the National Association of Realtors, 33 percent of all sales were at or above the asking price, a strong indication … more
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