Updated February 26 at 8:50pm
Op-ed / Letters to the Editor
101 results total, viewing 1 - 10
On Jan. 5, The New York Times ran an article about the anguished outcry of Harvard University’s faculty over the imposition of copays and deductibles for their health care coverage. Even with these changes, coverage for Harvard’s employees remains significantly richer than that typically in the marketplace. more
Our family fell in love with Rhode Island in 2004 when we moved from Virginia to take a job at the Naval War College in Newport. It was nice to be back in New England – my wife and I were both born and raised in Massachusetts. more
To the Editor: My dealer is very concerned about the current direction Rhode Island is heading with regards to marijuana legalization. Obviously he cannot speak for himself for fear of his personal safety, so he has asked me to reach out on his behalf. He is actually a staunch advocate of keeping marijuana illegal, which might surprise people. Currently he makes about $160,000 every year, tax-free of course, and before decriminalization passed he made more than $200,000. If legalization moves forward, he could see his income shrink even more. more
As costs for higher education skyrocket and enrollments in graduate-level business programs level off, business schools face an urgent need to remake themselves. They must consider not just devising alternative delivery formats, but also revamping cost structures, staffing systems and other traditional aspects of the existing business model that make education almost unaffordable. In so doing, they could lead the way for change throughout higher education. more
Like the owls that deliver packages and carry messages in Harry Potter’s world, drones are about to become commonplace in ours: small, flying objects perfectly engineered to drop off burritos, pick up prescriptions and photograph revolutions. Within the next three years, drone-driven commerce will amount to $13.6 billion and create 70,000 new jobs, an industry trade group estimates. more
American children are having fewer accidents than they once did, and our natural inclination is to cheer the news. The rate of “nonfatal fall injuries” among children ages 5 to 14, for example, declined by more than 10 percent from 2001 to 2012. But if fewer childhood falls reflect increasing attempts to safety-proof life, the trend might not be the improvement it seems. Various indicators suggesting reduced dynamism in the U.S. economy can be viewed similarly; our inclination is to celebrate a reduction in job-destruction rates, but should we? more
To the Editor: HealthSource RI represents an effort by the state under federal health care reform laws and regulations to improve the quality of benefits and competitiveness of the individual and small group markets (“United’s marketplace may be first to challenge HealthSource RI,” Feb. 5). more
When tensions over the Black Sea confrontation fell last week, global markets rallied to multiyear highs. In the United States, the S&P 500 closed at an all-time high of 1873.91. Other markets set new multiyear or all-time highs as well. The world is breaking out. more
Much of the recent controversy over the funding for Rhode Island’s health insurance exchange, Healtsource RI, misses the point of how the exchange fits into a larger vision of health care reform. Hopefully, the bold reform initiative just submitted to the General Assembly by the stakeholder advocacy group HealthRIght (of which I am chairman) will lend some perspective to the reform effort in our state. more
To the Editor: Recently, CVS Caremark Corp. solidified its standing as a health care business devoted to the well-being of its customers above all else by ending the sale of tobacco products in its stores (“CVS to end sale of tobacco products in stores by Oct. 1,” Feb. 5, 2014). more
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 11 | Next »