Updated March 2 at 7:02pm
Op-ed / Letters to the Editor
97 results total, viewing 91 - 97
The NCAA men’s basketball tournament tipped off last week, and one of the questions that was on everyone’s mind prior to the start was: Should I root for – or against – Harvard? more
To the Editor, The legalization of the sale of marijuana in Colorado is producing more than $2 million dollars of new tax revenue each month. Rhode Island and other states may soon follow suit and legalize marijuana (“Marijuana legalization would be very bad news for his dealer,” March 3, 2014). However, marijuana, like tobacco, can be very harmful to children. The sale of these products should be regulated to keep them out of the hands of children. more
Defining inflation is easy – a rise in the price of goods and services. But measuring it is really hard. Air Canada’s plan to cram more passengers onto its planes is a case in point. more
Much of the recent controversy over the funding for Rhode Island’s health insurance exchange, Healtsource RI, misses the point of how the exchange fits into a larger vision of health care reform. Hopefully, the bold reform initiative just submitted to the General Assembly by the stakeholder advocacy group HealthRIght (of which I am chairman) will lend some perspective to the reform effort in our state. more
Like the owls that deliver packages and carry messages in Harry Potter’s world, drones are about to become commonplace in ours: small, flying objects perfectly engineered to drop off burritos, pick up prescriptions and photograph revolutions. Within the next three years, drone-driven commerce will amount to $13.6 billion and create 70,000 new jobs, an industry trade group estimates. more
When tensions over the Black Sea confrontation fell last week, global markets rallied to multiyear highs. In the United States, the S&P 500 closed at an all-time high of 1873.91. Other markets set new multiyear or all-time highs as well. The world is breaking out. more
American children are having fewer accidents than they once did, and our natural inclination is to cheer the news. The rate of “nonfatal fall injuries” among children ages 5 to 14, for example, declined by more than 10 percent from 2001 to 2012. But if fewer childhood falls reflect increasing attempts to safety-proof life, the trend might not be the improvement it seems. Various indicators suggesting reduced dynamism in the U.S. economy can be viewed similarly; our inclination is to celebrate a reduction in job-destruction rates, but should we? more
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