Updated April 18 at 9:18am
Public Policy
471 results total, viewing 461 - 470
Rhode Island’s landfill has about 24 more years of life left in it, but a new push to recycle stained, worn and damaged clothes and other textiles may help stretch out that life a little longer. more
The plan by New England governors to finance new natural gas pipelines and electrical transmissions lines with charges on energy bills has been thrown into uncertainty. more
BOSTON – A lobbying firm will pay $100,000 to resolve allegations it profited from an inappropriate contingency-fee agreement with a Brighton, Mass., hospital, Attorney General Martha Coakley announced last week. more
BOSTON – Gov. Deval L. Patrick this month signed a new economic-development package to provide training to ensure the workforce meets the needs of employers, and also invest in the state’s Gateway Cities to promote development across the state. more
BOSTON – Massachusetts added 13,800 jobs in July for a total of 3,422,100 jobs, while total unemployment edged up 0.1 of a percentage point to 5.6 percent from the June rate, the Mass. Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development said. more
PROVIDENCE – The Municipal Road and Bridge Revolving Fund, a cost-saving program designed to provide a predictable funding source for local road and bridge improvements, benefited nine Rhode Island municipalities and 16 projects, generating $785,000 in savings in fiscal 2014. more
A new Rhode Island law strengthening safety regulations related to the sale of children’s jewelry goes into effect in November. It updates 2012 legislation passed and signed into law requiring all jewelry and charms manufactured in Rhode Island for children aged 12 and younger must meet standards set by the American Society for Testing and Materials. more
Wild oysters, with their craggy shells and the natural, complex reefs they grow on, are almost just a memory in Rhode Island – 99 percent of them are gone. more
General Dynamics Electric Boat has hired more than 720 employees so far this year at its Quonset Point facility in North Kingstown and is looking to add hundreds more in the next few months. more
A food company that regularly poisoned people wouldn’t expect to stay in business for long. A pharmaceutical company whose drugs made patients sick would be shut down. But a bank that repeatedly rips off its customers? Why, it can just keep paying fines, toss out a “mea culpa” press release, and get back to business as usual -- even when it’s 80 percent owned by taxpayers. more
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