Updated March 3 at 1:03pm
Public Policy
497 results total, viewing 481 - 490
Swapping rusted, green steel for the colorful lights and Art Deco-shapes of Pawtucket’s new Interstate 95 Bridge has given city leaders a boost of confidence that other neglected parts of their riverfront can be improved. more
NEWPORT – Neighbors of The Breakers estate in Newport are suing to block a new welcome center that’s planned for the site of the mansion, The Associated Press reported last week. more
The cost to emit carbon dioxide in the U.S. Northeast rose by one-third this month after the region’s cap-and-trade program revised its rules to cut the supply of permits, Bloomberg News reported. more
PROVIDENCE – State Sens. Harold M. Metts and Juan M. Pichardo, both Providence Democrats, are urging Attorney General Peter F. Kilmartin to commit a portion of the $230 million in Google settlement funds received by Rhode Island to funding re-entry programs for ex-offenders. more
When the West Broadway Neighborhood Association held its 30th Anniversary Gala at the Cranston Street Armory last fall, it was the first time many of the 1,100 attendees had ever stepped inside the yellow-brick battlements of a building known as the “people’s castle.” more
The city this spring will once again apply for a federal transportation grant to fund a new streetcar system between Upper South Providence and College Hill, Providence officials said Friday. more
Brown University has awarded the Newport Historical Society a $10,000 grant to support work to document and interpret the university’s founding. more
Rhode Island’s combined state and federal top marginal tax rate on personal dividends income, currently 28.6 percent, ranks as the 20th highest rate in the country, according to a study published by the Tax Foundation on Tuesday. more
Whether it’s STEM, as in Massachusetts, or STEAM, popularized in Rhode Island, the goal of both educational acronyms and states is the same: build a more capable workforce. more
American children are having fewer accidents than they once did, and our natural inclination is to cheer the news. The rate of “nonfatal fall injuries” among children ages 5 to 14, for example, declined by more than 10 percent from 2001 to 2012. But if fewer childhood falls reflect increasing attempts to safety-proof life, the trend might not be the improvement it seems. Various indicators suggesting reduced dynamism in the U.S. economy can be viewed similarly; our inclination is to celebrate a reduction in job-destruction rates, but should we? more
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