Updated March 5 at 6:05pm
Transportation
215 results total, viewing 191 - 200
Crouched by the curb with grease-stained hands and furrowed brows, cyclists know all too well the frustration of a slipped chain or malfunctioning derailer. more
A roadwork slowdown reminiscent of the partial closure of the federal government last year is now hanging over the U.S. economy as Congress leaves town without a deal for replenishing the Highway Trust Fund. more
Is airline consolidation really so bad for the flying public? On the surface it would seem that way. In 2013, for instance, 85 percent of all U.S. domestic passengers flew on one of just four airlines -– each of which expanded substantially as a result of a merger or acquisition between 2008 and 2013. Meanwhile, between 2007 and 2012, airfares rose 4 percent. Consolidation appears to have reduced competition. more
Bike share isn’t easy. There’s community hostility to worry about – from drivers, anti-gentrification activists and even neighbors who don’t like a system’s chosen color – plus numerous technical land mines and the challenge of staying solvent. more
Rhode Island is back at war with car-service apps Uber and Lyft. more
The Rhode Island taxi and car service markets were already in upheaval when pink mustaches began appearing on the grills of sedans weaving through Providence, signaling another new competitor for local transportation dollars. more
The Providence chapter of the International Association of Administrative Professionals recently selected Celina Kesack as its 2014 Administrative Professional of the Year. more
It’s a moment Providence, the state and especially the seven members of the Interstate 195 Redevelopment District Commission have been waiting for. more
Last week the R.I. Division of Public Utilities and Carriers heard testimony on the topic of minimum charges for rides offered by nontaxi motor vehicles. more
If there were any doubts that 2014 would go down in history as a turning point for auto safety, last month’s Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing on defective air bags erased them. Coming on the heels of the still-expanding investigation into General Motors’ faulty ignition switches, the congressional grilling of air-bag supplier Takata and customers Honda and Chrysler was yet another demonstration of the auto industry’s inability to find and fix deadly defects. This year’s scandals have not only shattered recall records, but they also have repeatedly exposed systemic failures by automakers, suppliers and regulators alike. more
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