Hands-on science learning boosts girls’ confidence

SURFACE TENSION: Suzanne Fogarty, second from right, head of Lincoln School, performs a science experiment looking at water surface tension effects, with sophomore students. From left, Cecelia DiPrete; Kennedy May; Fogarty; and Morgan Hall. / PBN PHOTO/ MICHAEL SALERNO
SURFACE TENSION: Suzanne Fogarty, second from right, head of Lincoln School, performs a science experiment looking at water surface tension effects, with sophomore students. From left, Cecelia DiPrete; Kennedy May; Fogarty; and Morgan Hall. / PBN PHOTO/ MICHAEL SALERNO
The underrepresentation of women in fields that require advanced math and science, including computer science and engineering, could have its start with their education as younger girls. Education research has found self-confidence among many young women begins to wane in adolescence. By college, they may question their own abilities, or drop a class rather than…

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