Power plant expected to be a start to solve power costs

REALLY NOT NEEDED? The proposed natural gas-fired power plant in Burrillville was rejected over the summer by state regulators after the company proposing to build it, Invenergy, could not prove to the state Energy Facility Siting Board that it was needed. Now a study by the Rocky Mountain Institute questions whether nearly all plants across the nation such as this will be economically feasible at all within a decade and a half, thus supporting more investments in renewable energy. / COURTESY INVENERGY LLC
REALLY NOT NEEDED? The proposed natural gas-fired power plant in Burrillville was rejected over the summer by state regulators after the company proposing to build it, Invenergy, could not prove to the state Energy Facility Siting Board that it was needed. Now a study by the Rocky Mountain Institute questions whether nearly all plants across the nation such as this will be economically feasible at all within a decade and a half, thus supporting more investments in renewable energy. / COURTESY INVENERGY LLC
A natural gas-powered electrical plant proposed in Burrillville could introduce more than 900 megawatts to the New England grid, and is the largest generation project in a decade in Rhode Island. But even if approved, it won't eradicate demand for more power supply in the region, given the expected exit of several older energy plants…

Want More Free?

To access 2 more articles, please log in or register for free.

Registered users get access to a limited number of free articles every month.

Register Now

Already registered? Login to access more free articles.

Purchase NowWant to share this story? Click Here to purchase a link that allows anyone to read it on any device whether or not they are a subscriber.

- Advertisement -