Thursday, September 23, 2021

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STEADY GROWTH: Cole DeSanty, right, director of client development for The Hire LLC, speaks with his colleagues, from left, CEO Tyler Wentworth; Bryan Soderberg, manager of candidate success; and Chief Operating Officer Erin Pavane. The Providence job placement firm has seen steady revenue growth since offering unlimited PTO from its inception in 2017. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

THE ULTIMATE PERK: More companies consider offering unlimited vacation time. Others...

When Erin Pavane landed a job at a tech startup in Massachusetts eight years ago, she was shocked about one of the perks: Pavane...
LAB VISIT: Roger Williams University President Ioannis Miaoulis visits with Emma Place, left, and Alicia Schickle, who are examining the Northern Star Coral being raised in the university’s wet lab. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

AN ENGINEER’S ATTITUDE: At RWU, Miaoulis revels in opportunities to solve...

(Editor’s note: This is the second installment in an occasional series of interviews with the state’s new wave of higher education leaders. You can...
COVID CASUALTY: Stephanie lgoe stands in front of the former Hallworth House building in Providence, a nonprofit nursing home where she served as administrator before it closed in the summer of 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. / PBN PHOTO/MIKE SKORSKI

UNCLEAR CARNAGE: Just how badly has pandemic hurt R.I.’s small businesses?

Heather Wall still gets emotional when she drives past the empty storefront on Frenchtown Road in North Kingstown. The darkened space in Hunt River Commons...
TRAINING HUB: Jennifer Menard, left, interim vice president of economic and business development at Bristol Community College, and Laura Douglas, college president, stand outside the future home of the school’s National Offshore Wind Institute on the New Bedford waterfront. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

Unchartered training: How does region build workforce for new wind sector?

Toiling hundreds of feet above the open ocean, sometimes amid stormy weather and battering waves, technicians in the offshore wind industry need not only...
JOYFUL ENDEAVOR: Providence College President the Rev. Kenneth R. Sicard remembers being impressed with the Dominican friars when he was a PC student. It drew him to their community.  / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

PC president looks to market Friars’ brand on national level

(Editor’s note: This is the first installment in an occasional series of interviews with the state’s new wave of higher education leaders.) The Rev. Kenneth...
A PATIENT HOST: Erin Umbdenstock held out hope she’d get her job back when she was laid off from the Providence Marriott Downtown when the COVID-19 pandemic hit. It turned out better than that for her. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

Hospitality’s headache: How to attract, keep workers 

Erin Umbdenstock spent her four-month stint of unemployment trying to keep busy. She cooked and cleaned her Coventry apartment and took up several new hobbies....
AT THEIR POST: John and Sarah Cullen behind the counter of their gift shop Solstice on Water Street on Block Island. They’re hoping for a very busy summer. / PBN PHOTO/CASSIUS SHUMAN

BRACING FOR THE WAVE: Tourism industry ready for big rebound, but...

A year ago, John and Sarah Cullen were fearing for the future of their Block Island gift shop. With supply chains choked by the COVID-19...
DOUBLE DUTY: Virginia Burdick, a certified nursing assistant and mother of two, stands in front of her two-bedroom apartment in South Kingstown. Burdick, who works two jobs to be able to afford the rent for the apartment, was recently approved by the South County Habitat for Humanity for one of its homes in Exeter, which she hopes to move into by the end of the year. / PBN PHOTO/ELIZABETH GRAHAM

MISSING MIDDLE: R.I. focuses on finding housing for people who fall...

Certified nursing assistant Virginia Burdick works two jobs so she can afford the rent for her cramped, two-bedroom apartment in South Kingstown. Her daughter,...

Lawyers only constant in ever-evolving General Assembly

Farmers were a powerful voting bloc in Rhode Island in the early days of statehood and ruled the General Assembly. That’s because the structure of...
JACKS OF ALL TRADES: Because Rhode Island’s General Assembly serves part time, the 75 representatives and 38 senators make their living in a variety of other ways, including as lawyers, teachers, bankers, public employees and health care workers. Fifteen are retirees. The “other” category includes two stay-at-home parents, two farmers, a carpenter, a landscaper, a law student and a Ph.D. student. Four citizen legislators are featured on Pages 14 and 15. / SOURCE: R.I. GENERAL ASSEMBLY OFFICIALS  /  ILLUSTRATION: PBN/ANNE EWING

DOUBLE DUTY: Should R.I.’s citizen legislature become a full-time body?

Every year, Rhode Island’s 113-member citizen legislature has plenty to pack into a six-month session. This year has been no different. Major issues debated include...

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