Communities create ‘Safe Stations’ in effort to reduce overdose deaths

AID ­AVAILABLE: Pawtucket Emergency Medical Services Director Lance Dumont and Elizabeth Moreira, the city’s public health and equity leader, hold kits containing naloxone and fentanyl testers at the Newport Avenue fire station, which became a Safe Station for people seeking help with drug addiction.
PBN PHOTO/ELIZABETH GRAHAM
AID ­AVAILABLE: Pawtucket Emergency Medical Services Director Lance Dumont and Elizabeth Moreira, the city’s public health and equity leader, hold kits containing naloxone and fentanyl testers at the Newport Avenue fire station, which became a Safe Station for people seeking help with drug addiction.
PBN PHOTO/ELIZABETH GRAHAM
Rhode Islanders who are struggling with substance abuse now have places they can go to get immediate attention and support, after fire departments and police stations in eight Rhode Island communities created “Safe Stations.” Pawtucket was the latest to establish the 24/7 outreach centers, doing so at the city’s five fire stations in January. The…

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