DOUBLE DUTY: Should R.I.’s citizen legislature become a full-time body?

JACKS OF ALL TRADES: Because Rhode Island’s General Assembly serves part time, the 75 representatives and 38 senators make their living in a variety of other ways, including as lawyers, teachers, bankers, public employees and health care workers. Fifteen are retirees. The “other” category includes two stay-at-home parents, two farmers, a carpenter, a landscaper, a law student and a Ph.D. student. Four citizen legislators are featured on Pages 14 and 15. / SOURCE: R.I. GENERAL ASSEMBLY OFFICIALS  /  ILLUSTRATION: PBN/ANNE EWING
JACKS OF ALL TRADES: Because Rhode Island’s General Assembly serves part time, the 75 representatives and 38 senators make their living in a variety of other ways, including as lawyers, teachers, bankers, public employees and health care workers. Fifteen are retirees. The “other” category includes two stay-at-home parents, two farmers, a carpenter, a landscaper, a law student and a Ph.D. student. / SOURCE: R.I. GENERAL ASSEMBLY OFFICIALS / ILLUSTRATION: PBN/ANNE EWING
Every year, Rhode Island’s 113-member citizen legislature has plenty to pack into a six-month session. This year has been no different. Major issues debated include raising the minimum wage, legalizing marijuana, hashing out a 20-year lottery contract and affordable housing, not to mention helping navigate Rhode Island out of an economy-crushing pandemic. And, oh yeah,…

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