Investment behavior, diversity focus of Bryant University forum

JOHN NOFSINGER, professor of finance at the University of Alaska Anchorage, speaks about the psychology of investing and how biological traits are informing investment behavior at the recent Bryant University Financial Services Forum. / COURTESY BRYANT UNIVERSITY
JOHN NOFSINGER, professor of finance at the University of Alaska Anchorage, speaks about the psychology of investing and how biological traits are informing investment behavior at the recent Bryant University Financial Services Forum. / COURTESY BRYANT UNIVERSITY

SMITHFIELD – Speakers at Bryant University’s 13th annual Financial Services Forum on Friday focused on investment behavior and diversity in the workplace.

The annual daylong event featured keynote speakers John Nofsinger, professor of finance at the University of Alaska Anchorage, and Cheryl Nash, president of Investment Services at Fiserv, a global financial technology-services company.

Nofsinger, also the William H. Seward endowed chair in international finance, focused on the psychology of investing and how biological traits are informing investment behavior.

“Nofsinger’s talk [focused] on the psychology of investing, Thaler’s ‘Nudge’ theory on decision-making and the biology of finance, exploring the latest research on genetics, neuroscience and how hormones, and nature versus nurture, inform our investment behavior,” according to the school.

CHERYL NASH, at the right far of the table, speaks about building diversity and a strong talent pipeline in the workforce at the recent Bryant University Financial Forum. / COURTESY BRYANT UNIVERSITY
CHERYL NASH, at the far end of the table, talks about building diversity and a strong talent pipeline in the workforce at the recent Bryant University Financial Services Forum. / COURTESY BRYANT UNIVERSITY
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Nash, meanwhile, focused on how to build diversity and a strong talent pipeline in the workforce. She examined the financial-services industry and how a more diverse workforce could lead to greater success for individuals and companies.

“When adding diversity to the equation (age, gender and geography), teams make better decisions 87 percent of the time,” according to her presentation.

Eli Sherman is a PBN staff writer. Email him at Sherman@PBN.com, or follow him on Twitter @Eli_Sherman.