New WashTrust ad campaign uses R.I. businesses, locations to tout ease of opening accounts, banking online

THE WASHINGTON TRUST CO. has announced a new multimedia campaign featuring Rhode Island talent, businesses and locations to illustrate how fast and easy it is to open deposit accounts or bank online. / COURTESY THE WASHINGTON TRUST CO.

WESTERLY – The Washington Trust Co. will embark on a new multimedia campaign featuring Rhode Island talent, businesses and locations to illustrate how fast and easy it is to open deposit accounts or switch to the bank online, the bank recently announced.

Produced in both Spanish and English, the campaign compares the speed of account opening with the time it takes to experience classic Ocean State favorites, such as drinking a Del’s lemonade, riding the carousel at Roger Williams Park Zoo and Carousel Village, enjoying hot wieners for lunch, or waiting for the perfect wave at the beach, according to a news release.

“Washington Trust is committed to providing the best banking experience for our customers,” said Edward O. “Ned” Handy III, chairman and CEO. “We understand people lead busy lives and this campaign illustrates, in a fun way, how our technology makes it fast and easy to open personal deposit accounts online and then quickly and securely switch direct deposits and recurring payments from another bank or credit union to Washington Trust.”

The bank’s new campaign, which reinforces its “What We Value is You” brand positioning, was developed by Washington Trust’s marketing team in partnership East Greenwich advertising agency Walsh & Associates Inc. and New Bedford film and production company Montage Media Productions.

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The campaign collaborated with the R.I. Film & Television Office to feature local businesses, such as Del’s Frozen Lemonade and the N.Y. System restaurant in the Olneyville section of Providence, and to film with local talent at locations throughout the state, such as Roger Williams Park Zoo and Misquamicut State Beach.

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