Rhode Island Textile Innovation Network lauded by national group

THE RHODE ISLAND Textile Innovation Network held its official launch at the Slater Mill Museum in Pawtucket. From left, Michael Woody, President is RITIN and CEO of TransTex, and Jack Wilson of Griswold Textiles. / COURTESY STEVE MASON
THE RHODE ISLAND Textile Innovation Network held its official launch at the Slater Mill Museum in Pawtucket. From left, Michael Woody, President is RITIN and CEO of TransTex, and Jack Wilson of Griswold Textiles. / COURTESY STEVE MASON

PAWTUCKET – With the official launch of the Rhode Island Textile Innovation Network at the Slater Mill Museum in Pawtucket, the National Council of Textile Organizations offered its congratulations.

“Rhode Island companies make some of the world’s most amazing textiles and are an important cog in the U.S. textile and apparel supply chain, especially with respect to innovating and manufacturing textiles used by America’s military,” said NCTO President and CEO Auggie Tantillo.

“The global textile and apparel sector is experiencing an era of rapid change. Rhode Island is to be commended for being proactive in helping to ensure that its industry remains at the forefront in leveraging those changes to America’s benefit,” Tantillo added.

The brainchild of Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., and the University of Rhode Island’s Business Engagement Center, RITIN was created in 2016. The group is supported by grants from Real Jobs Rhode Island and R.I. Commerce Corp.

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Michael Woody of Trans-Tex LLC in Cranston is RITIN’s chairman; Mary Johnson of Polaris MEP is program manager.

RITIN looks to make the state a leader in advanced textile manufacturing, in part by finding ways to recruit and train the future workforce of the industry. At the launch, the group hosted an expo with local manufacturers and unveiled its new website, according to NCTO.

NCTO is a Washington, D.C.-based trade association representing domestic textile manufacturers, such as artificial and synthetic filament and fiber producers.

Susan Shalhoub is a PBN contributing writer.

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