Surplus of question marks: Decisions on tax cuts, housing policies, education aid among matters in the balance

RETURN TO THE ROSTRUM: Senate President Dominick J. Ruggerio takes his place at the front of the Senate chambers on Jan. 3, the first day of the 2023 General Assembly session. It’s a position Ruggerio has held since 2017. 
PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
RETURN TO THE ROSTRUM: Senate President Dominick J. Ruggerio takes his place at the front of the Senate chambers on Jan. 3, the first day of the 2023 General Assembly session. It’s a position Ruggerio has held since 2017. 
PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
No one would blame the General Assembly leadership if it breathed a little easier in the 2023 legislative session. After all, the top Democratic leaders won reelection in the fall, the economic havoc touched off by the COVID-19 pandemic continues to fade and, for the second year in a row, state budget officials are projecting…

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  1. For decades we’ve had a quasi-public agency to cultivate a thriving life science and biotechnology hub similar to what already exists in Massachusetts: The Slater Technology Fund. Why re-create the wheel? Just fund The Slater Technology Fund.