With specialized equipment, many now can find fitness and social interaction at the gym

GOOD FIT: Guillermo Perez, right, helps Gary Balletto get hooked up to a stationary bike made for people with paralysis at an adaptive gym Balletto created inside the Cranston YMCA. Balletto has a spinal cord injury and wanted to give others with similar injuries and disabilities a chance to work out with everyone else.
 / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
GOOD FIT: Guillermo Perez, right, helps Gary Balletto get hooked up to a stationary bike made for people with paralysis at an adaptive gym Balletto created inside the Cranston YMCA. Balletto has a spinal cord injury and wanted to give others with similar injuries and disabilities a chance to work out with everyone else.
 / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
Noise, chatter and a feeling of camaraderie are typical of most fitness center visits. Gym-goers are rarely alone, sweating it out, even if conversation is kept to a minimum. But for people with spinal cord injuries or some neurological diseases, opportunities to exercise in a social setting are often rare, and workouts at a facility…

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