After decades of work, light at end of CSO tunnel

DIGGING IT: Workers for the contractor CB3A start working on the main shaft of the combined sewer overflow tunnel that will run more than 100 feet below the city of Pawtucket. The shaft, located on School Street in Pawtucket, will be 60 feet in diameter and will allow a boring machine to be lowered in. / COURTESY NARRAGANSETT BAY COMMISSION/PETER GOLDBERG
DIGGING IT: Workers for the contractor CB3A start working on the main shaft of the combined sewer overflow tunnel that will run more than 100 feet below the city of Pawtucket. The shaft, located on School Street in Pawtucket, will be 60 feet in diameter and will allow a boring machine to be lowered in. / COURTESY NARRAGANSETT BAY COMMISSION/PETER GOLDBERG
What happens beneath the streets of Providence and surrounding cities is unseen by residents, but after heavy rainfall, the result always ends up in nearby rivers and Narragansett Bay. For decades, following storms, the street drains and sewers that are part of the city’s underground infrastructure had overflowed, discharging untreated water into waterways. A massive…

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