R.I.’s solar industry has grown with the help of state incentives. What happens when they run out?

GREEN ENERGY: David Lamb, assistant director of utilities management at the University of Rhode Island, and Marcia Garcia, URI’s sustainability officer, stand among a field of solar panels in South Kingstown. The solar array is part of the 40-megawatt South Kingstown Solar Collaboration facility, of which URI is one of three partners. 
 / PBN PHOTO/BRIAN MCDONALD
GREEN ENERGY: David Lamb, assistant director of utilities management at the University of Rhode Island, and Marcia Garcia, URI’s sustainability officer, stand among a field of solar panels in South Kingstown. The solar array is part of the 40-megawatt South Kingstown Solar Collaboration facility, of which URI is one of three partners. 
 / PBN PHOTO/BRIAN MCDONALD

[Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part series looking at the growth of Rhode Island’s solar and offshore-wind industries and expectations for renewable energy in the region’s energy supply. See part 2 here.] After stints in the California, Nevada and Texas solar-energy industries, Kenny Hsieh learned of the financial incentives offered in Rhode

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