Aquanis looks to curb wind-energy costs

SMART TECH: From left, Todd Griffith, associate professor at the University of Texas at Dallas; Mario Rotea, professor at the University of Texas at Dallas; Neal Fine, CEO of Aquanis; and John Cooney, chief technology officer of Aquanis, at a conference held in Denver on July 8-10. Aquanis develops smart-blade technology for wind turbines.
 / COURTESY AQUANIS
SMART TECH: From left, Todd Griffith, associate professor at the University of Texas at Dallas; Mario Rotea, professor at the University of Texas at Dallas; Neal Fine, CEO of Aquanis; and John Cooney, chief technology officer of Aquanis, at a conference held in Denver on July 8-10. Aquanis develops smart-blade technology for wind turbines.
 / COURTESY AQUANIS
From the ground, wind-turbine blade rotation appears nearly effortless, as though the spinning is entirely propelled by air currents. In reality, the movement and the force of the wind consume a large amount of energy, which East Greenwich’s Aquanis Inc. hopes to conserve by creating smart-blade technology. Improving the blades’ aerodynamic performance would reduce the…

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