Fighting back vs. bad roads

R.I.’s reputation for bad roads is (mostly) earned, though some communities are fighting back

PROACTIVE APPROACH: ­Warwick Mayor Joseph J. Solomon stands on New England Way at the intersection of Gilbane Street. Both roads are on the schedule to be repaved. Solomon said roadwork has been a priority since he took office in spring 2018. He says last year was the first time in 20 years the city has implemented a proactive program.
 / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
PROACTIVE APPROACH: ­Warwick Mayor Joseph J. Solomon stands on New England Way at the intersection of Gilbane Street. Both roads are on the schedule to be repaved. Solomon said roadwork has been a priority since he took office in spring 2018. He says last year was the first time in 20 years the city has implemented a proactive program.
 / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
Evidence of Rhode Island’s rough roads turns up regularly at Harold Crook’s Garage in Cranston. Bent wheel rims, flat tires and alignment problems can often be traced to potholes, cracks and slipshod repaving following underground utility work, says garage owner James Clarke. “I see them all year because of the condition of our roads,” he…

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