Financially struggling zoos could be latest victims

SINKING FEELING: A visitor to the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward, Alaska, passes an exhibit at the aquarium and research center. A majority of visitors used to be cruise ship passengers, but most cruises have been canceled because of the ­pandemic. / ANCHORAGE DAILY NEWS VIA AP/MARC LESTER
SINKING FEELING: A visitor to the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward, Alaska, passes an exhibit at the aquarium and research center. A majority of visitors used to be cruise ship passengers, but most cruises have been canceled because of the ­pandemic. / ANCHORAGE DAILY NEWS VIA AP/MARC LESTER
SAN FRANCISCO – Since the coronavirus pandemic began keeping visitors at home, the jaguars and chimpanzees at the Oakland Zoo have enjoyed the quiet, venturing out to areas of their exhibits they usually avoid. The bears and petting pigs miss the children, though, and are seeking more attention from zookeepers. Some things, however, haven’t changed.…

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