Nurturing clients and staff a long-term gain

SPECIAL CARE: Dr. Day Care’s Foster staff, second row, starting third from left: teacher assistant Ashley Haigh, Head Teacher Peggy Lippitt, Director Diane DeCristo, and teacher assistant Linda Ramirez, pictured with the Foster Preschool Class of 2010.PHOTO COURTESY DR. DAY CARE /
SPECIAL CARE: Dr. Day Care’s Foster staff, second row, starting third from left: teacher assistant Ashley Haigh, Head Teacher Peggy Lippitt, Director Diane DeCristo, and teacher assistant Linda Ramirez, pictured with the Foster Preschool Class of 2010. PHOTO COURTESY DR. DAY CARE /

Dr. Day Care Inc. employees pride themselves in offering a nurturing environment for hundreds of Rhode Island children. The small day care chain’s management takes as much pride in doing the same for staff.
It’s a benefit not lost on employees.
“I came in as an administrative assistant and now, I’m doing the marketing for the entire company,” said Bethany Tortis, Dr. Day Care’s marketing coordinator. Workers who show leadership ability and talent are often placed in director-in-training roles with the idea they will fill future openings.
Company President and CEO Mary Ann Shallcross Smith – “Dr. Day Care” – not only sees career growth as a way to keep employees happy, but having homegrown directors, for example, is strategic to the company’s rapid growth. Started as a small home day care in 2005, it now has four locations, with a fifth opening in the fall.
“To see your company hiring and expanding in a rough economy means a lot,” said Tortis.
Another benefit employees value is a 50 percent discount for child care services for their own children.
Employees say, though, it’s the investment in their future that stands out.
Each year, the day care surveys employees to pinpoint training needs. Armed with that input and advice from management, a training calendar for the year is set for all employees. Along with helping make better child care providers, training is focused on leadership skills.
Tortis said employees feel like they can influence the company’s direction by not only providing better service to children and families, but having a say in the company’s future. They do that formally at annual strategic-planning sessions.
Tortis said it’s easy to take pride in work when you become a “valued stakeholder in developing” a company. &#8226

No posts to display