R.I.’s reform of state worker pensions was only the tip of the fiscal iceberg that awaits cities and towns

DIRE PREDICTION: Johnston Police Department Detective James Brady, president of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers Local 307 in Johnston, discusses the town's combined police and firefighter pension plan. He estimates that unabated, the plan could go bankrupt in eight years. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
DIRE PREDICTION: Johnston Police Department Detective James Brady, president of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers Local 307 in Johnston, discusses the town's combined police and firefighter pension plan. He estimates that unabated, the plan could go bankrupt in eight years. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
Editor’s note: This is the first of a four-part series exploring how well Rhode Island cities and towns are funding municipal pension and benefit plans and the public-policy ramifications. The financial challenges of taking care of her daughter, Miranda Rose, who has Down syndrome, have grown for Linda M. Connell since 2011. That’s when Providence…
To read the full story, Subscribe or
Subscribe to PBN
- Advertisement -

1 COMMENT

  1. Impressive journalism. This is a huge issue. Underfunded pensions are a slow-motion train wreck waiting to take the R.I. economy down. We need more in-depth, comprehensive conversations like this one if we are going to figure out how to deal with this complicated issue.