Affordable mobility

ON A GOOD ROLL: Mobility Equipment Recyclers accepts donations of new and used mobility medical devices and equipment, including powered wheelchairs, for resale at a discount. From left are Andrew Celani, store manager, Bailey, company mascot, John Perrotti, owner and Raymond Perez, technician. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
ON A GOOD ROLL: Mobility Equipment Recyclers accepts donations of new and used mobility medical devices and equipment, including powered wheelchairs, for resale at a discount. From left are Andrew Celani, store manager, Bailey, company mascot, John Perrotti, owner and Raymond Perez, technician. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
John Perrotti didn't set out to become a specialist in repair and resale of motorized wheelchairs and other mobility devices. His business started with a single donated wheelchair. At the time, Perrotti worked in construction. One of his clients gave him a wheelchair and told him to sell it, if he could. When Perrotti couldn't…
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  1. I think this is the same young man (pictured in the middle) who worked for Liberty Mobility in West Warwick a few years back. If I remember correctly, he was working part time for his uncle (the owner of Liberty Mobility) after he left college. I would frequent the store many times to purchase items for my wheelchair and I would see him there working in the back cleaning parts and disassembling wheelchairs. One day I went there and he was gone. Funny, now I see him here with his own business, doing the exact same thing as his uncle. I wonder where he learned it from? He certainly didn’t come up with the business idea on his own as you state here in your article. I know that for a fact!!!!!. Very misleading article!