Designers try to devise better safe-injection sites

EASY TO UNDERSTAND: Amy Qu, a recent Rhode Island School of Design graduate, presents her redesign of the fentanyl test strips as part of the Design Beyond Crisis studio course in May. The redesign is intended to make the strips easier to use for people without training. 
COURTESY RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN
EASY TO UNDERSTAND: Amy Qu, a recent Rhode Island School of Design graduate, presents her redesign of the fentanyl test strips as part of the Design Beyond Crisis studio course in May. The redesign is intended to make the strips easier to use for people without training. 
COURTESY RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN
In Providence and Pawtucket, harm-reduction organization Project Weber/RENEW regularly hands out test strips that can detect whether a drug sample contains fentanyl, a highly potent opioid that can cause an overdose, even at trace amounts.  While the organization makes it easier for individuals to access the test strips, figuring out how to use the strips…

You must be a subscriber to read this content. To keep reading and receive unlimited access subscribe today for only $1.
Subscribe Now Already a Subscriber? Login now

Purchase NowWant to share this story? Click Here to purchase a link that allows anyone to read it on any device whether or not they are a subscriber.

No posts to display