Sunday, November 27, 2022

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ASSISTANCE: Rhode Island Legal Services staff attorney Brian Furgal, Roger Williams University School of Law student Nicole Palmer, center, and RWU faculty member Eliza Vorengerg operate the Eviction Help Desk outside Sixth District Court at the Garrahy Judicial Complex in Providence.
PBN PHOTO/
MICHAEL SALERNO

Housing crisis putting eviction law in spotlight

Most of Providence Mayor Jorge O. Elorza’s peers at Harvard Law School weren’t interested in eviction defense work. The pay was low. Elorza, who worked...

New R.I. law ensures gratuities get into the right hands

Anyone who has worked in the service industry knows how rapidly things can change from one shift to the next. One night’s tips might cover...
CRYPTO ­CONCERNS: Leigh E. Furtado, attorney and senior associate at the law firm Day Pitney LLP, says she’s finding more clients inquiring about protecting their crypto­currency during estate planning. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

Crypto can complicate trust, estate planning

“HODL,” an abbreviation for “hold on for dear life,” has become a motto for a class of cryptocurrency enthusiasts who aren’t interested in selling. But...
TEST CRITIC: Eric J. Mitnick, dean of the University of Massachusetts School of Law in Dartmouth, stands outside the Licht Judicial Complex in Providence. Mitnick is among the legal observers who believe the bar exam should be changed to better test the skills would-be attorneys will need to practice law. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

Will bar exam undergo more change in future?

A year after Rhode Island lowered its passing score for the bar examination, the effect on pass rates remains murky. In March 2021, the R.I....
A SPOT ON THE BENCH: William J. Trezvant was one of two people of color sworn in as state judges in January, but some argue Rhode Island hasn’t done nearly enough to diversify the judiciary. / PBN PHOTO/RUPERT WHITELEY

Jury still out on effort to diversify R.I. judiciary

William J. Trezvant grew up surrounded by Black lawyers and judges, thanks to his dad’s leadership of the Newport chapter of the NAACP. Those early...
ENHANCED ­­ABILITIES: R.I. Attorney General Peter F. Neronha says a new state law gives his office more power to pursue businesses accused of deceptive or unfair business practices. / PBN FILE PHOTO/RUPERT WHITELEY

New R.I. law strengthens protection for consumers

Bad drivers and a weak business climate aren’t the only measurements by which Rhode Island ranks poorly compared with other states. For nearly two decades,...
HALLWAY LAW: Troy Lange, staff attorney for the Housing Law Center at Rhode Island Legal Services, works at the Eviction Help Desk outside District Court in Providence, ready to help low-income tenants unfamiliar with the legal proceedings. / PBN PHOTO/MARC LAROCQUE

At court, tenants facing eviction find ‘heartbreak hallway’

The third-floor hallway of the Garrahy Judicial Complex in Providence was choked on a recent Thursday morning with tired-looking families, upset mothers with baby...
WAIT AND SEE: Attorney John L. Calcagni III says there are some gray legal areas when it comes to a new Rhode Island law that creates a pilot program for safe injection sites, or “harm reduction centers,” to counteract the opioid overdose crisis. / PBN PHOTO/ELIZABETH GRAHAM

Legal questions loom for R.I.’s injection center law

Combating the opioid overdose crisis is a cause with broad support. But a new Rhode Island law establishing a two-year pilot program for safe injection...
GET READY: ­Jessica Schachter Jewell, a labor and employment attorney in Nixon Peabody LLP’s Providence office, says all Rhode Island businesses should prepare for the new pay equity law before it goes into ­effect. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

Under R.I. equity measure, firms may need wage audit

Rhode Island’s new pay equity law is still more than a year away from taking effect, but Ocean State businesses should be taking steps...
EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITY: A lawsuit filed on behalf of Roger Williams University law student Lindsay Koso was successful in persuading the R.I. Office of the Attorney General to waive a $225 fee when she requested copies of public records as part of research she was conducting for a law review article. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

RWU student scores win in open-records dispute

When second-year law student Lindsay Koso started working on an article for the Roger Williams University Law Review last fall, she had no idea...
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