DEWETRON technology supporting NASA space exploration

DEWETRON, an Austrian data acquisition systems company with a location in East Greenwich, is contributing its technology to NASA’s Artemis space missions. / COURTESY DEWETRON

EAST GREENWICH – Rhode Island-based technology is helping NASA break multiple barriers in space exploration.

DEWETRON, an Austrian data acquisition systems company with a location in East Greenwich, is contributing its technology to a NASA mission slated to bring humans back to the moon, and, eventually, to another planet.

The company already supported NASA in the first of two planned Artemis missions, which launched in 2022, and is gearing up to provide further support for 2025’s Artemis II mission.

The two Artemis missions include multiple firsts, NASA said: They will establish the first long-term human presence on the moon and send the first humans to mars, while astronauts Christina Koch and Victor J. Glover will make history as the first woman and first person of color to land on the moon.

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To support these missions, DEWTRON is providing ground instrumentation units, which NASA uses to gather and monitor real-time data about spacecraft launch environments and carry out modal testing.

Additionally, electric ground support technology from DEWETRON will provide flight data to support health and safety among crew members.

These contributions were “essential in the development, support and data collection” of several spacecraft launch, abort and recovery systems, said Richard Taylor, senior electrical design engineering manager at Jacobs Space Exploration Group, a fellow NASA partner.

Taylor and other leaders of the Artemis program recently visited the East Greenwich company in recognition of its role in the missions.

“New England plays a key role in the Artemis program, and a lot of crucial suppliers are concentrated in the region,” Taylor said. “It can be hard for suppliers to realize the importance and impact of their support to the mission. These visits help bridge that gap and give their workforce a sense of pride that their contributions mattered.”

Jacquelyn Voghel is a PBN staff writer. You may reach her at Voghel@PBN.com.

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