Can the Ocean State stay in the race for offshore wind-energy profits?

IMPROVEMENTS UNDERWAY: ProvPort Terminal Manager Chris Waterson identifies a section of the port that will handle wind turbines. The port is undergoing improvements after voters in 2016 approved $20 million in upgrades.  / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

IMPROVEMENTS UNDERWAY: ProvPort Terminal Manager Chris Waterson identifies a section of the port that will handle wind turbines. The port is undergoing improvements after voters in 2016 approved $20 million in upgrades. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

[Editor’s note: This is the second of a two-part series looking at the growth of Rhode Island’s solar and offshore-wind industries and expectations for renewable energy in the region’s energy supply. See part one here.] The nation’s first offshore wind farm is spinning off Block Island. But Rhode Island appears to be playing catch-up to…

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