Nurse practitioners fill need for patients as primary care physicians decrease

HANDS-ON LEARNING: Denise Coppa, left, coordinator of the family nurse practitioner concentration at the University of Rhode Island and interim associate dean of URI’s College of Nursing, with Kristen Rameika, seated, of South Kingstown, and Caryn Amedee, of East Providence. Both are graduate students in the Nurse Practitioner program at URI. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
HANDS-ON LEARNING: Denise Coppa, left, coordinator of the family nurse practitioner concentration at the University of Rhode Island and interim associate dean of URI’s College of Nursing, with Kristen Rameika, seated, of South Kingstown, and Caryn Amedee, of East Providence. Both are graduate students in the Nurse Practitioner program at URI. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO
Within the past decade, the number of nurse practitioners in Rhode Island has grown steadily, reflecting what is seen as a growing demand for their services and an understanding that they help people who need access to primary care services. Nurse practitioners, or NPs, are nurses who have advanced education and clinical training. They aren’t…

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