Payoff for whistleblowers can be large, but so can personal costs

WHISTLEBLOWER COMPLAINTS: Thomas J. Enright, an attorney with Enright Law in Cranston, said the most common whistleblower complaints seem to be with health care companies and that settlements are the norm in such cases, with only about 3% going to trial.
 / PBN PHOTO/
DAVE HANSEN
WHISTLEBLOWER COMPLAINTS: Thomas J. Enright, an attorney with Enright Law in Cranston, said the most common whistleblower complaints seem to be with health care companies and that settlements are the norm in such cases, with only about 3% going to trial.
 / PBN PHOTO/
DAVE HANSEN
After working for Rhode Island Medical Imaging Inc. for two decades, the last seven as its executive director, Wayne Arruda believed he had found that the company was overbilling Medicare and Medicaid for unnecessary or unrequested tests. Soon after going to the company with these allegations, Arruda says, he was fired and had his reputation…

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