Saturday, December 4, 2021

TOPICS

Focus

UNDER REVIEW: Terry Telesmanick, right, Centreville Bank senior vice president of bank operations, speaks with Branden Powers, retail operation supervisor, at the bank’s West Warwick headquarters. Telesmanick says Centreville is in the midst of reevaluating its services and fees, including overdraft fees.  / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

Overdraft fees getting plenty of scrutiny

While banks were denounced as villains of the 2008 recession, their response to the COVID-19 crisis had some calling them heroes. The praise was based...
WAIT AND SEE: Attorney John L. Calcagni III says there are some gray legal areas when it comes to a new Rhode Island law that creates a pilot program for safe injection sites, or “harm reduction centers,” to counteract the opioid overdose crisis. / PBN PHOTO/ELIZABETH GRAHAM

Legal questions loom for R.I.’s injection center law

Combating the opioid overdose crisis is a cause with broad support. But a new Rhode Island law establishing a two-year pilot program for safe injection...
GET READY: ­Jessica Schachter Jewell, a labor and employment attorney in Nixon Peabody LLP’s Providence office, says all Rhode Island businesses should prepare for the new pay equity law before it goes into ­effect. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

Under R.I. equity measure, firms may need wage audit

Rhode Island’s new pay equity law is still more than a year away from taking effect, but Ocean State businesses should be taking steps...
IN DISCUSSIONS: David Marble, left, CEO and president of OSHEAN Inc., a nonprofit whose objective is the creation of a broadband network in Rhode Island, talks with Mark Montalto, OSHEAN vice president of business development. 
PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

Broadband buildout at standstill in most of R.I.

When Kristin Monje began working at the Block Island School 32 years ago, the most advanced technology in the building was an overhead projector. Monje...
THE HEALING TOUCH: University of Rhode Island assistant professor Daniel Roxbury, left, and former URI graduate student Mohammad Moein Safaee display the “smart bandage” they spent two years developing. / COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

URI researchers are the brains behind ‘smart bandage’

Imagine a future with a bandage that could sense whether an infection was developing and could tell the patient or caregiver to get the...
SUMMER SOCIAL: Wendy Kagan, left, executive vice president for employee and community engagement at BankNewport, was eager to return to a traditional work environment once pandemic-related restrictions eased. Employees Lesley Vogt-Behan and Paul Marchetti, right, enjoy pizza and salad during one of the company’s Pizza Wednesdays, which it implemented to entice workers to return to the office. / PBN PHOTO/TRACY JENKINS

Home or office? Worker morale is in the balance

Free pizza for lunch may not outweigh the conveniences of working at home. But it can, perhaps, sweeten the deal for those reluctant to...

Teens come to the rescue in struggle to find help

The owners of restaurants, amusement parks and retail shops, many of them desperate for workers, are sounding an unusual note of gratitude this summer:...
WORK SITE: Amy Grzybowski, future director of a planned higher education center in northern Rhode ­Island, visits the building in downtown Woonsocket that will be converted into the center by late 2021 or early 2022. / PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

Downtown Woonsocket getting a higher ed boost

The workforce in southern Rhode Island got a helping hand in getting crucial training when the state opened the Westerly Education Center four years...
POINT OF CONTENTION: State Rep. Brian Patrick Kennedy overlooks the Potter Hill Dam at the Pawcatuck River. The town of Westerly wants to remove the dam, but some residents in Westerly and Hopkinton are concerned about the aftereffects. / PBN PHOTO/ELIZABETH GRAHAM

R.I. dam dangers remain, but awareness rises

Plans to remove a deteriorating dam along the Pawcatuck River in Westerly and Hopkinton have riverfront residents in both towns upset that lower water...
DIGGING IT: Workers for the contractor CB3A start working on the main shaft of the combined sewer overflow tunnel that will run more than 100 feet below the city of Pawtucket. The shaft, located on School Street in Pawtucket, will be 60 feet in diameter and will allow a boring machine to be lowered in. / COURTESY NARRAGANSETT BAY COMMISSION/PETER GOLDBERG

After decades of work, light at end of CSO tunnel

What happens beneath the streets of Providence and surrounding cities is unseen by residents, but after heavy rainfall, the result always ends up in...

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